Rate of Increase in Workload Determines the Mobilization Rate But Not the Degree of Increase in ECG Parameters

Authors

  • Kristina Poderienė
  • Alfonsas Buliuolis
  • Vilma Papievienė
  • Jonas Poderys

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.33607/bjshs.v1i96.77

Abstract

Background. The aim of this study was to compare the peculiarities of the dynamics of cardiovascular functional
state indices during bicycle ergometry by applying the steep or slow increase in workload.
Methods. Twenty five  males attending health promotion sport clubs took part in two cardiovascular testing
procedures by performing graded exercise stress, i.e. increase in workload every 1 min, and increase in workload
every 6 min, and they exercised till the inability to continue the task or unless distressing cardiovascular symptoms
supervened; 12 lead ECG was recorded and analysed.
Results. The steep increase of registered cardiovascular parameters was observed at onset of exercising and
the rate of was in dependence on the rate of the increase in workload. Registered maximal changes of heart rate, JT
interval, and the ratio JT/RR as functional state indices at the moment of refusing to continue the graded exercise test
were at the same level while applying the steep or slow increase in workload.
Conclusions. The rate of increase in workload determines the mobilization rate but not the degree of increase
of ECG parameters. Maximal changes of heart rate, JT interval, and the ratio JT/RR as functional state indices at
the moment of refusing to continue the graded exercise test were at the same level while applying the steep or slow
increase in workload.

Keywords:  cardiovascular system, graded exercise stress, functional state

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Published

2018-05-03

How to Cite

Poderienė, K., Buliuolis, A., Papievienė, V., & Poderys, J. (2018). Rate of Increase in Workload Determines the Mobilization Rate But Not the Degree of Increase in ECG Parameters. Baltic Journal of Sport and Health Sciences, 1(96). https://doi.org/10.33607/bjshs.v1i96.77

Issue

Section

Sports Physiology